Category Archives: Work I’ve Done

Me vs. “MuTEs”: Enhancing Cancer’s Hallmarks via Mutation

A small insertion mutation creates a landing site for transcription factor proteins, which drives overproduction of TAL1 protein and leukemia cell traits. Cancer scientists say all the time that “cancer is a disease of the genome,” but I still have … Continue reading

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Beating Cancers’ Unexpected Vice: Transcription – at AmericanScientist.org

Many thanks to Tom Dunne from Sigma Xi for this cartoon of vice-ridden cancer cells. My second post over at American Scientist’s renovated blog network tackles some of the latest thinking about a new process to target that is especially … Continue reading

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How We Drugged a Leukemia’s Favorite Transcription Network

If we “cure cancer” in the woods and no one is there to read about it, will patients reap the rewards? I did computational analyses for a recent paper in Nature that describes a new chemical that kills leukemia cells … Continue reading

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Me vs. Super-Enhancers and How I Navigated the Grad-Student-to-Post-Doc Transition

We got peer reviews on our co-submissions the week after I arrived. Our companion paper seemed a shoo-in, but our primary paper– the one defining the concept– was in jeopardy. All the reviewers had serious concerns with the very notion. … Continue reading

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Me vs. GATA3: How I Survived My First Scientific Paper and What it Said

The sun was coming up over building 10 as my workday finally drew to a close. Ke$ha Pandora had kept me company in the dark and awake until Figure 3 was finally done. Every scientist remembers his or her first … Continue reading

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